Spring Harvest Rice | Meal Prep Recipe – Vegan

This large batch rice recipe is veggie-packed, vegan and can make enough to feed you throughout the week. Substitutions included in the recipe notes!

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meal prep with spring harvest rice
This recipe is great for meal prep! It makes a large batch and keeps well throughout the week.

Versatile & Meal Prep Friendly

This is a meal prep recipe that can easily be adapted to supplement different proteins and side dishes throughout the week, or to be used as is for a delicious and healthy meal prep lunch!

It’s flavor profile is flexible and truly can be made into a side dish or entrée with anything. Similar to Spanish Rice, Spring Harvest Rice uses fresh tomatoes and a plethora of vegetables and spices.

Make as is and it will yield about 10 cups of rice.

chopped vegetables for spring harvest rice
Make the recipe as written, or substitute ingredients you prefer.

Swap It Out

Not everyone likes peas and bell peppers, and that’s a-okay with me! Here’s a few substitution ideas to suit your tastes.

  • Instead of PEAS try edamame or sliced snap peas
  • Instead of BELL PEPPERS try carrots and celery
  • Instead of RICE try farro, barley, quinoa or couscous. Cook according to package directions and follow the rest of the recipe as written.

When swapping vegetables in this recipe, keep the measurements the same. This will ensure your rice comes out as tasty as possible!

Additionally, I encourage you to use simply whatever you have on hand. Even if it’s a combination of the vegetables in your fridge to match the measurements in the recipe – that’s great! You’ll prep a delicious rice dish and cut down on food waste. Win-win.

See recipe for a full list of substitutions.

Use this spring harvest rice as the base for a delicious burrito! Add roasted sweet potatoes, black beans and cheese of your choosing for an easy meal.

Spring Harvest Rice Meal Ideas

Here’s a few ways you can make Spring Harvest Rice a meal.

Vegan

Eat as is with some fried tofu (thai peanut or teriyaki would go well) and crispy balsamic-glazed roasted brussel sprouts

Vegetarian

Wrap rice with black or refried beans in a flour tortilla topped with shredded cheese for an easy vegetarian burrito.

Omnivores

Serve with rotisserie chicken for an easy weeknight dinner.

spring harvest rice on a plate
Spring Harvest Rice — look at all those veggies!

The Cooking Process

To make this rice the best it can be, the vegetables need time to simmer. Put the pot on while you’re doing other things around the house, and check it periodically. You won’t need to watch it the entire time it cooks, so it’s good to cook when you’re already at home and can peek in on it every once in a while.

Browse through the photos below to see different phases of the cooking process and the final product.

There’s no replacement for time when cooking. Each step of the recipe builds a layer of flavor, toasting the spices, sautéing the aromatics, and then adding the fresh tomatoes and allowing them to cook down. The result is a lightly spiced, flavorful rice packed with vegetables. It’s a hearty, flavorful dish.

Spring Harvest Rice (Meal Prep Recipe – Vegan)

This is a meal prep recipe that can easily be adapted to supplement different proteins and side dishes throughout the week, or to be used as is for a delicious and healthy meal prep lunch!
It's flavor profile is flexible and truly can be made into a side dish or entrée with anything. Similar to Spanish Rice, Spring Harvest Rice uses fresh tomatoes and a plethora of vegetables and spices.
Make as is and this will yield about 10 cups of nutrient-rich rice.
Prep Time 20 mins
Cook Time 1 hr
Total Time 1 hr 20 mins
Course dinner, lunch
Cuisine American, Spanish
Servings 10 cups

Ingredients
  

  • 6 cups cooked rice (white or brown) 3 cups uncooked
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon each of the following herbs: oregano, parsley, onion powder, garlic powder, smoked paprika, cumin
  • 1 green bell pepper diced
  • 1 yellow onion diced
  • 3 cloves garlic minced
  • 4 cups fresh tomato diced (subsitute canned)
  • ½ red bell pepper diced
  • 1 lb frozen peas
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 2 tsp black pepper

Instructions
 

  • First, cook your rice.
    I prefer using an Instant Pot, or Rice Cooker, but you are welcome to use any method you'd like, including microwaved steamed rice (no shame in shortcuts).
    Substitute couscous, farro, or barley and cook according to package directions.
    Set aside for now.
  • In a large, heavy bottomed pot, or dutch oven over medium/medium high heat add oregano, parsley, onion powder, garlic powder, smoked paprika and cumin. Toast briefly (a minute or less) to bolster their flavors.
    Next, add in 3 tablespoons of olive oil, or preferred cooking oil, and heat until shimmering.
  • Add diced onion, garlic, and bell peppers. Sauté until tender, about 10 minutes.
  • Add tomatoes and simmer uncovered over medium heat about 30-40 minutes, until tomatoes are cooked down and there is minimal liquid left in the pot.
    Simply put, it should look less like tomato sauce and more like a big pot of sautéed vegetables.
  • Incorporate the bag of frozen peas and salt and pepper. Mix well to combine and defrost the peas.
    When using frozen peas, it's best to add them at the last minute. If they cook too long, they turn mushy!
  • Add the rice 1-2 cups at a time, mixing well.
    Be sure to break up the chunks of rice to blend with the vegetables. Repeat the process until all of the cooked rice is incorporated.
    Done!

Notes

  • Substitute rice for farro, barley, quinoa, or couscous. Cook according to package directions. 
  • Combine any of your preferred spices for a custom blend. Add some cayenne if you enjoy heat, or swap basil for paprika if you prefer things more mild.
  • Substitute sliced snap peas or edamame for frozen peas, if preferred. 
  • Substitute carrots and celery for bell peppers, maintaining measurements.
Keyword easy meal prep, meal prep recipe, meal prep rice, spring harvest rice, vegan meal prep, vegetarian meal prep

Have you tried this Spring Harvest Rice? What substitutions did you make? Let us know how you liked it in the comments below!

Chickpea Salad | Vegetarian Recipe

A quick and easy recipe for hearty, delicious chickpea salad. Think of it like chicken salad, but with chickpeas and bell peppers instead of chicken and celery! Enjoy on toasted bread, over leafy greens, or on your favorite crackers.

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a bowl of chickpeas

Why Chickpeas?

Chickpeas are a great source of protein with a whopping 14 grams in 1 cup. They’re also a substantial source of fiber, with 12 grams per cup. For more on chickpea nutrition, click here.

In addition to their enviable nutritional value, chickpeas are simply delicious! They are (in my humble opinion) the legume of all legumes. Their creamy texture lends itself well to dips like hummus. Alternatively, they make a delicious addition to any dish pan fried with some olive oil and spices, my favorite way to eat them.

Canned chickpeas are affordable and accessible, making them a must have pantry item.

chickpea salad sandwich

Ways to Eat

Enjoy this chickpea salad on some toasted bread with spinach as a sandwich, or spooned over leafy greens for a hearty salad. Or spread over crackers for a quick snack!

This chickpea salad can be made in a large batch ahead of time and enjoyed throughout the week. It’s a great meal prep item because it lasts well in the fridge and can be enjoyed in a variety of ways.

This recipe was featured in 4 Reasons to Eat More Plant-Based. Read full post here.

chickpea salad on toast
Chickpea salad on toast

Easy Chickpea Salad (Garbanzo Bean)

A quick and easy recipe for hearty, delicious chickpea salad. Think of it like chicken salad, but with chickpeas and bell peppers instead of chicken and celery! Enjoy on toasted bread, over leafy greens, or on your favorite crackers.
Prep Time 15 mins
Course dinner, lunch
Cuisine American

Ingredients
  

  • 2 cups chickpeas (garbanzo beans) drained and rinsed if using canned
  • 3 tablespoons mayo use vegan mayo if preferred
  • 1 tablespoon mustard dijon, spicy brown and whole grain all work well
  • ¼ cup chopped green onions can substitute celery if preferred
  • ¼ cup chopped bell peppers any color you'd like
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 teaspoon each of spices – paprika, garlic powder, onion powder and chili powder substitute your preferred spices as desired
  • 1 tablespoon horseradish optional
  • Drizzle of olive oil optional

Instructions
 

  • Drain and rinse the chickpeas. Chop onions, and bell peppers. Set aside.
  • In a medium-sized bowl, add the chickpeas. Use a pastry cutter or potato masher to mash the chickpeas in a bowl. Consistency should be a bit chunky, but mashed enough to add easily to a sandwich.
  • Add mayo, mustard, horseradish (optional), salt, pepper, spices, onions, bell peppers and a drizzle of olive oil. Mix well to combine.
  • Taste chickpea salad and adjust seasonings if desired.
  • Enjoy!
Keyword chickpea recipe, chickpea salad, garbanzo bean recipe, vegan recipe, vegetarian recipe

What is Meal Prep and Why Should You Consider It? | Lifestyle

Meal prep is growing in popularity as a method of saving money on going out, maintaining a healthy diet, or just being able to enjoy a home-cooked meal without actually having to cook the entire meal every night.

The intention of this article to shed some light on things:

Welcome to Meal Prep 101!

meal prep

What is Meal Prep?

At it’s most basic, meal prep is preparing your meals ahead of time. While meal prep was initially popular as a means of maintaining a healthy diet (think weight loss/muscle building) it’s come to be so much more. Having dinner prepared (or, mostly prepared) at the end of a day’s work makes things so much easier. I enjoy the ability to eat a home-cooked meal every night, without having to make it all from scratch.

There’s two general categories of meal prep we’ll cover:

  • Daily Meal Prep
  • Batch Meal Prep

Which one you choose depends on your personal needs, including how much time you have to get dinner “on the table” every night and how much cooking you’d like to do. Meal prep can be used to create a full slate of meals for the week, including breakfast, lunch and dinner, or can be used for that one meal of the day you never seem to have enough time to make.

If you are just starting off with meal prep, I suggest picking one meal a day to prep. It’s a nice way to ease into prepping and you’ll have the opportunity to try different meal prep methods to see what works best for you.

meal prep

Daily Meal Prep

Daily meal prep involves fully preparing full meals to eat throughout the week. With this, you can prepare a weekday’s worth of breakfasts, lunches and dinners ahead of time. These can be the same dish for each meal, or a variety, depending on how much you’d like to prep.

Here is an example menu for all three daily meals utilizing the same dish for each. This is a typical workweek (M-F) meal prep menu.

These are all items I’ve made and prepped for the week. I chose them because they contain ingredients and flavors that I enjoy, and because they are relatively easy to make in large batches.

The biggest advantage I found with daily meal prep was not having to think about what I was going to make for dinner, or scrounge up for lunch every day. During the workweek, my meals were covered. I had filling and delicious breakfast, lunch and dinner all planned out.

Some daily meal plans also include snacks. I keep mine simple with fruit, nuts, or chips and salsa. I’m also a big fan of popcorn, which is easy to make on a whim.

There are a TON of resources for planning meal prep, some of which I’ve included at the end of the article. Recipes made for meal prep can be particularly useful, as not all dishes hold up well over the course of a few days. They may be safe to eat, but less enjoyable or lose their texture.

Batch Meal Prepping

batch meal prep example menu

Batch meal prep differs from daily meal prep primarily in that it involves cooking, or at the very least, assembling meals before you eat them. This may be more suitable for someone who has the desire to cook dinner every night, but may be short on time. Meal prepping this way saves cooking time and allows you to throw together delicious, homemade meals in minutes.

Here’s an example menu, where chicken breast and ground beef were batch cooked before the workweek.

Setting aside time to wash, dice and prep vegetables for the week is also a way of batch meal prepping. This type of meal prep allows for more flexibility, as well as fresh-made meals, but does require more time and planning. To do batch meal prep well, you’ll need a plan for the week on what you’d like to make. Now, that can always change, but it’s much easier to prep when you have an idea of what you’ll be cooking for the week.

Why Meal Prep?

Have complete control over what ingredients go into the food you are eating.

For some, meal prep is a way to control what goes into their food. I’m lactose intolerant, so having prepped meals that I knew contained not one trace of dairy was a relief, and much easier on my body. If you have specific dietary needs, such as gluten intolerance or practicing veganism, meal prep can be an easy stress-free way to eat with confidence.

Meal time convenience.

With your meals already prepared, no thought is required when meal time comes. Heat up your meal (or not, if its a no-reheat meal like salad or a fun bento box) and you are ready to eat. By having a homemade, prepared option, you’re less likely to eat out, grab fast food, or even substitute a granola bar for dinner (no shame intended, but you are worth more than a granola bar!).

Saves money.

Buying groceries in bulk and preparing your own food undoubtedly saves you money, particularly if you shop what’s on sale and in season in the grocery store. Saving money on weekday cooking means more funds for weekend fun! Personally, I’d rather save during the week and go somewhere special on the weekends.

Less dishes throughout the week/on days with prepped meals.

Need I say more? Typically, I deep clean my kitchen once a week, after we’ve completed prep. All it needs is simple maintenance throughout the week to stay clean and organized.

Improve your cooking skills.

Tackle basics you’ve been wanting to learn or branch out and try something new. Additionally, meal prep will improve your budgeting and planning skills, a completely unanticipated but warmly welcomed side effect of meal prep I discovered a few months into it.

100% customizable.

It’s YOUR meal prep… make what you want to eat! Whether it’s low carb, vegan, high protein, all greens, you name it, you can prep it. There are some incredible resources available to assist with your meal prepping journey. You can choose to have meal plans created for you to follow, use a meal-planning service like Blue Apron, or do it all on your own. It’s up to you.

meal prep

How does meal prep work in real life?

My husband and I both work full-time. Certainly having breakfast and lunch made work days easier, and saved us the time, effort, and money of going out to eat for lunch every day. Having dinner meal prepped allowed us the opportunity to heat and eat, and have more time to relax and enjoy each other’s company at the end of the day.

Honestly, when we first started meal prepping, I hated it. It takes a few hours on the weekend, and at first I felt I was wasting time. Despite my discontent, I increasingly appreciated being able to come home from work and have dinner ready. I didn’t have a mound of dishes in the sink, only our meal prep containers and plates to rinse and throw in the dishwasher. Eventually, I learned to love meal prep and couldn’t imagine doing it any other way.

Whichever way you choose to prep, the most important part is finding what works for you. Otherwise, you won’t be consistent about it. Whether that means carving out a few hours on a Sunday afternoon, or prepping for only three days at a time, find what works for you and run with it.

Everyone has different reasons for meal prep. For us, it was a time-saving, convenient way to enjoy homecooked meals. Additionally, it helped us save money, which we’d prefer to splurge on a nice evening out or stash away for a vacation full of fun new foods.

crop cooks preparing pasta in kitchen

A note about time management

Depending on what and how much you meal prep, you may find yourself with all four burners occupied on the stove and both racks in the oven full. This can be overwhelming at first, cooking three full meals for multiple days at once.

My best advice, start slow. You’ll learn what you can do at the same time as you go, and you’ll get better at kitchen multitasking in the process. Here’s a basic method to tackle meal prep:

  1. Dice your veggies and measure ingredients — In the world of foodservice, this is called mise en place meaning everything in its place. Have everything ready to go, so that once you start cooking, its a seamless process of adding ingredients. This way you won’t be rushed to chop an onion when you’re pot of water is boiling and the chicken is ready to be taken out of the oven. It can get hectic, fast.
  2. Start with the oven — Once your ingredients are ready, start with the recipes to be made in the oven. Whether it’s roasted veggies, or a sheet pan pork chop, get the oven heated and get those things in there first. Oven recipes are great for meal prep, because once their in there, the oven does all the work.
  3. Move to the stove — While your food bakes away in the oven, turn your attention to the stovetop. Start anything you’ll be cooking and keep a close eye on it. In the meantime, clear counter space to place those hot pans once they’re ready to come out of the oven.
  4. Let everything cool — Don’t store your food as soon as its done cooking. In accordance with food safety measures, it’s best practice to allow hot food to come to room temperature before placing it in the refrigerator. Otherwise, it may cool down unevenly and even leave food susceptible to spoilage. No one wants that. While everything cools, set out your containers.
  5. Fill and store — Once everything is cool, fill up your containers and stick them in the fridge. For no heat meals like salads, keep dressing separate and items that may cause the lettuce to get soggy, like tomatoes or cucumbers.
meal prep

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Don’t you get tired of having the same thing every day?

A: The honest answer is… sometimes! When we make something I don’t like that much, or that didn’t turn out as I had expected, it gets tiresome to eat it day after day.

But when we make dishes I truly enjoy eating, that are filling and tasty and cooked to my preference, I do not tire of eating it throughout the week. Make no mistake — I greatly look forward to the weekends, but I’d much prefer eating the same dinner five days a week without the stress of whipping up a healthy meal after a full work day. Chicken Enchiladas and the Lemon Miso Pork with Coconut Curry Vegetables were two meal preps I 100% looked forward to eating every single day. As I said before, it’s imperative to find what works for you and to start with flavors and dishes you already know you love!

Q: Can you ever eat out? Aren’t you committed to eating what you prep?

A: Yes, you can eat out and no, you aren’t obligated to eat what you prep for every meal. The flexibility of your meal prep depends on your own personal preference. I’d rather make meals for the week and have that option. When plans change, or the opportunity arises to eat out, or with friends/family, it is simple enough to put the planned, prepped meal into the freezer to eat at a later date. By doing this, you’ll eventually build up enough meals to eat for a week without prepping! Believe me, it happens faster than you’d think.

Q: Does all of your prep really keep for five days?

A: It depends. Some ingredients hold up much better than others. An easy way to think about it: any food that would hold up to a trip to the beach, or a picnic is a great candidate for meal prep. There are also ways to preserve your food, like dressing salads only right before you eat them.

Foods that, once cooked, get mushy or undesirable in a day are not recommended for meal prep — my number one example: zucchini! Additionally, if you are concerned about the freshness of your food, you can prep for three days a time only, instead of the full five.

Ultimately, start small to learn what you are comfortable with. We’ve prepped this way for over a year and have never had issues with food going bad. There were some things that just weren’t tasty after a day, but those were experimental and things we won’t do again. Okay, so it was the one time I tried making roasted radishes. The internet made it look tasty but I do not recommend. Ever.

meal prep

Meal Prep Resources

Workweek Lunch

meal prep

My all-time favorite meal prep resource. Talia, founder of Workweek Lunch, provides kitchen-tested meal prep recipes, sized and ready for you to cook. The website is full of free recipes, but to unlock all of the meal prep potential, including weekly meal plans complete with recipes and a shopping list, a subscription is required. I’d recommend starting with the free recipes if you’re new to prepping and consider a subscription if you’re having difficulty planning what to make each week.

Budget Bytes

Budget Bytes has an entire section on their website dedicated to meal prep recipes. Beth, founder of Budget Bytes, creates tasty recipes on a budget that don’t compromise nutrition or flavor.

The Kitchn

The Kitchn has a great list of meal prep plans to get you started prepping. All the meals are planned out for you, and they give you full recipes and cooking instructions.

Edible Ink

meal prep

Yep, that’s me! I have a growing collection of meal prep recipes available on the website, as well as an ongoing series of posts about meal prep (including this one). I also have two different meal planning templates available as free downloads on the Free Resources page.

Do you meal prep? If not, is it something you’re interested in? Let me know in the comments below.

Until then, happy prepping!

Chia Pudding And Granola Parfait | Meal Prep Recipe – Vegan

Sized for meal prep, this made-ahead breakfast is easy to put together for a sweet, nutrient packed breakfast.

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Photo by Ella Olsson on Pexels.com

What is Chia Pudding?

The name may be misleading, as chia pudding consists of gelled chia seeds that expand about 2-3x their normal size after absorbing liquids. The seeds remain whole but do soften. They also have a particularly fascinating ability to attract one another and tend to bead together on the back of a spoon, say, a bit like water droplets. You’ll see what I mean when you make this.

No dairy is involved in this pudding. Of course, unless you chose to add it. If you replace the non-dairy milk with dairy milk, I’d recommend omitting leaving the pudding on the counter for an hour to set. Give it a good whisk and stick it straight in the fridge. During the first hour of setting time, pull it out intermittently, stirring to discourage clumping and adding more milk if liquid is needed, about a tablespoon or two at a time.

Breakfast sans Sugar Rush

Store-bought granola typically contains high amounts of sugar — be it high fructose corn syrup, pure cane, or molasses. Being sensitive to processed sugar (it’s a migraine trigger for me hooray) I’ve begun to pay particularly close attention to what I eat first thing in the morning. This may be personal, but I believe what I eat for breakfast stays with me all day. It can affect my mood, energy levels and how I feel physically.

That being said, this granola gains its sweetness from small amounts of honey, fruit jam and dried berries (such as cranberry or raisin). Customization is always encouraged, but for the cleanest breakfast, I’d recommend following the recipe as written. Together with some fresh fruit, this Chia Pudding & Granola Parfait becomes an enjoyably sweet breakfast without inviting a massive carb-loaded sugar crash mid-morning.

As always, feel free to add your own twist and enjoy!

Chia Pudding and Granola Parfait

Make this recipe on a Sunday evening and enjoy throughout the week as a delicious, low sugar breakfast!
Prep Time 1 hr
Cook Time 20 mins
Total Time 1 hr 20 mins
Course Breakfast
Cuisine American
Servings 10 servings

Ingredients
  

Chia Pudding

  • 1 cup full fat coconut milk
  • 4 cups non-dairy milk
  • cup chia seeds
  • 1 tsp ground ginger
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 2 TB agave or jam

Easy Granola

  • 3 cups rolled oats
  • 2 TB coconut oil melted
  • ½ cup crushed nuts pecans, almonds, walnuts or peanuts
  • 2 tsp cinnamon
  • 2 TB agave or brown sugar
  • 2 TB jam of choice
  • ¼ cup dried berries cranberry, raisin or blueberry

Instructions
 

  • Preheat oven to 350°F.
  • Whisk coconut milk, non-dairy milk, ginger, vanilla and sweetener of choice in a large bowl. Once smooth, add in chia seeds and mix well.
  • Let chia pudding sit on counter for about an hour, whisking intermittently and adding liquid as needed. This helps the chia seeds to expand without clumping together. While chia pudding sets, prepare the granola.
  • Mix all granola ingredients in a large bowl. Cover a sheet pan with parchment paper and press granola into pan.
  • Bake granola for 20 minutes, until crisp.
  • Let granola cool on the counter. Once cool, store in an airtight jar on the counter.
  • Store chia pudding in an airtight container in the refrigerator.
  • To serve, spoon chia pudding into a bowl. Add chopped fruit, peanut butter or preserves and top with granola. Enjoy!
Keyword chia pudding, chia seed, granola, meal prep breakfast, parfait

Have you ever tried chia pudding? Made this recipe? Let me know in the comments below!

Garlic, Lemon, Parsley, Tahini Salad Dressing | Recipe

This creamy, tart salad dressing is packed with flavor and nutrient-rich ingredients. Here we’ll take a closer look at three key ingredients in this recipe: parsley, lemon, and garlic.

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parsley

Parsley en Perpetua

Parsley is one of my favorite herbs because it is affordable, accessible, and an easy way to add freshness to any dish. This nutrient-rich herb is packed with Vitamins A, C and K. Parsley also contains minerals like magnesium and potassium, essential to a balanced diet.

This recipe utilizes a cup of parsley, which serves to balance out the heaviness of the tahini and rich olive oil.

When shopping for parsley, look for the flat leaf Italian parsley. This varietal provides much better flavor than the curly parsley, commonly used for garnish in restaurants.

To read more about parsley, click here.

lemons

Luscious Lemon

Lemon is a citrus fruit, and as a citrus, contains notable amounts of Vitamin C. Additionally, it is cleansing to your gut and supports digestion. In this recipe I use whole lemon, mostly skinned but including some peel.

Additionally, lemons contain a high amount of soluble fiber, which can have a detoxifying effect in cleansing out your system (if you know what I mean).

The peel and white part of the lemon (called the pith) contains the highest concentration of nutrients, therefore I make an effort to include it wherever possible! However, it can be quite bitter, so adjust the amount of pith used to your preference.

garlic

Gotta have that Garlic

We all love garlic right? Garlic breath not so much. However! Consuming garlic raw provides the highest concentration of nutritional benefits. Some have even claimed that it reduces blood pressure, lowers cholesterol and reduces the risk of heart disease. I’d say garlic breath is a small price to pay for all those benefits!

If you are still wary of consuming raw garlic at lunch time, never fear. You can easily swap roasted garlic for the raw garlic in the recipe.

For a full report on the benefits of raw garlic, click here.

tahini

What is tahini anyways?

Tahini is ground sesame seed paste. Tahini is one of the key ingredients in hummus. On it’s own, tahini can be quite bitter, which is why it makes for a dynamic ingredient to incorporate in sauces, dips, and in this instance, a salad dressing!

Some tahini is made with hulled sesame seeds, some aren’t; similarly, some are made with raw sesame seeds, and others with roasted. If this is your first tahini encounter, I’d recommend starting with the Organic Tahini from Trader Joe’s and venturing out from there.

Big batch does it best

This recipe yields approximately 20 ounces of salad dressing, or about 10 servings. That’s enough for two people to eat a salad five days in a row, which makes this an ideal meal prep salad dressing recipe!

With about 15 minutes of prep time, this Garlic Tahini Salad Dressing is easy to put together and can be made in a pinch. Drizzle over your favorite salad and enjoy!

Garlic Tahini Salad Dressing – V, GF, Raw

This creamy, tart salad dressing is packed with three key ingredients for maximum flavor and for improving your health.
Recipe yields enough for 10 servings (approximately 20 ounces). This will keep well in the refrigerator.
Prep Time 15 mins
Total Time 15 mins
Course dressing, lunch, Side Dish
Cuisine American, Mediterranean
Servings 10 servings

Ingredients
  

  • 1 cup fresh parsley packed, stems removed
  • 8 cloves fresh garlic peeled. (substitute roasted garlic if desired)
  • 3 tablespoons tahini
  • 2 tablespoons mustard dijon preferred
  • cup sunflower or avocado oil
  • cup extra virgin olive oil
  • cup cold water
  • cup white balsamic vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon salt (add more to taste)
  • teaspoon black pepper (add more to taste)
  • ½ whole lemon skinned, small in size. incorporate a small amount of peel if desired.
  • drizzle of agave syrup or honey if desired.

Instructions
 

  • Stir tahini well.
    It's common for tahini to become separated in the jar, with the oil settling on top and solids on the bottom. Stir well before measuring.
  • Cut lemon in half. Remove seeds from the half you plan on using in the recipe.
    To skin the lemon, place the cut (flat) side of the lemon on a cutting board and gently cut the skin off, making sure you are cutting down and away from your fingers. Leave as much (or as little) skin on the lemon as you'd like.
  • Add all ingredients to a blender or large food processor. Blend until smooth.
    To make the dressing without a blender: Finely mince the garlic, parsley and lemon. Combine all ingredients into a large jar and shake well until combined.
  • Taste and adjust the seasoning.
    If you find it bitter, add a pinch of sugar or drizzle of honey.

Notes

  • If you prefer a thicker dressing, omit the water. You can always add more later to reach your desired consistency.
  • For a less pungent garlic flavor, roast the garlic before adding it to the blender.
Keyword dairy free recipe, no sugar recipe, raw recipe, salad dressing, sugar free recipe, sugar free salad dressing, tahini dressing, vegan recipe, vegan salad dressing

Tried this recipe? Tell us how you liked it in the comments below!