Pão De Quiejo : Brazilian Cheese Bread | Recipe

Oh yes. Today we’re making the traditional Brazilian staple: pão de queijo. Literally translated, it means “bread of cheese” and really, that’s a great description. Soft, fluffy small rounds of cheesy goodness. Let’s get started!

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a basket of brazilian pao de queijo cheese bread

What is Pão de Quiejo?

Simply put, pão de queijo is a small cheese puff bread. It’s typically served with most meals in Brazil and eaten for breakfast.

There’s no exact written history of pão, of course, but it’s believed that, around 1700, women who were enslaved typically made pão de quiejo for farmers (don’t forget, Brazil was a Portuguese colony before it gained independence in 1822).

Pão de quiejo become a staple of Brazilian cuisine since, growing in popularity. You can now even find frozen versions of pão available in big stores like Costco.

One of the more distinguishing features of pão de quiejo is it’s flour — commonly known to us in the US as tapioca starch. Wheat crops didn’t grow well in the northern region of Brazil, where warm weather made growing the grain difficult. Instead, ground, dried cassava root was used in place of flour.

another delicious plate of pao de quiejo brazilian cheese break

Cassava root aka tapioca starch

Cassava is an incredibly drought-tolerant plant, making it a favorite crop of warmer, tropical regions. In the United States, cassava is also called:

  • Yuca
  • Manioc
  • Brazilian arrowroot

Cassava root is made into cassava flour, which is also called tapioca starch. These alternative names are useful to know when you are shopping for the ingredients to make your very own pão de quiejo!

Cassava flour possesses a unique, almost gelatinous quality when baked. Combined with the melted cheese, the pão de quiejo becomes impossibly soft, fluffy and chewy!

Once we got the hang of it, we made pão de quiejo en masse

Tried and tested Pão de Quiejo recipe

Let’s get personal for a moment. My dad’s side of the family is very familiar with Brazil and its cuisine. In fact, he lived there with my grandparents during his teenage years. So, it was a natural place for a family reunion.

In 2017, we all went down to Brazil! That’s where I tried pão de quiejo for the first time, along with my husband and my parents. Brazil has incredible food, including mousse de maracujá (passion fruit mousse) and of course, the Churrascuria (Brazilian barbecue).

When we returned home, we began testing recipes to replicate the impossibly perfect pão de quiejo we had in Brazil. Seriously, it seemed no matter where we went, it was perfect every time!

While we didn’t have access to the specific cheese typically used to make pão (meia cura/minas cheese), we found this substitute combination works beautifully! The sharp saltiness of the parmesan balances well with the mild, gooeyness (yes its a word) of the mozzarella.

For best results, buy the cheese whole and grate it yourself. Pre-shredded cheese sometimes gives off a chalky flavor.

Another non-traditional note: while pão de quiejo is typically formed and placed in rounds on a baking sheet, I found it easier to place the dough inside mini muffin tins. The tins helped the pão hold their shape, and made the shaping process much faster than if we were to shape them by hand. Not traditional, no, but effective? Yes.

Enjoy!

Pão de Queijo

Lauren Harvey
A traditional Brazilian bread, pão de queijo is easy to make with this straightforward recipe. Parmesan and Mozzarella replace authentic Brazilian cheese that is difficult to find in the United States. The result is a delicious, chewy, puffed cheese bread!
Prep Time 15 mins
Cook Time 20 mins
Total Time 35 mins
Course Side Dish, Snack
Cuisine Brazilian
Servings 30 pão

Equipment

  • Stand mixer
  • Mini muffin tin or baking sheet
  • Saucepan

Ingredients
  

  • 1 ½ cup parmesan cheese, grated
  • 1 cup Mozzarella cheese, shredded
  • 1 ¼ cups milk
  • ½ cup water
  • ¼ cup + 2 tbsp oil
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 4 cups tapioca flour
  • 1 tsp baking powder

Instructions
 

  • If you purchased pre-grated cheese, skip to next step.
    Grate the parmesan and shred the mozzarella. After measuring out the required amount, you can mix the cheeses together in a bowl and set aside.
  • Preheat oven to 400°F.
  • Set up your stand mixer so that it's ready to go for the next step. Add the tapioca flour and baking powder to the bowl of the mixer.
  • In a medium-sized saucepan, combine the wet ingredients (milk, water, oil and salt). Cover and bring to a gentle rolling boil over medium heat. Once boiling, pour over the flour in the mixer.
  • Turn on the mixer and mix on high until the tapioca flour and wet ingredients are well-incorporated. It will have a stretchy, sticky texture that is to be expected.
  • Add eggs one at a time. To make things easy, you can crack the two eggs into a small bowl and whisky gently. Pour this in a slow steady stream into the mixer on medium-high speed. Allow the eggs to incorporate in small increments before adding more.
  • Repeat a similar process with the cheese. Working in small batches, add the cheese into the batter slowly until fully combined.
  • Spray your mini muffin tin with non-stick spray. Using a small scoop or spoon, scoop the batter into the muffin wells.
  • Bake for 15-20 minutes, until puffy and golden.

Notes

This recipe was adapted from Olivia’s Cuisine
Keyword Brazilian Cheese Bread, Cheese Bread, Pão de Queijo

Have you ever had pão de quiejo? How did you enjoy this recipe? Let us know in the comments below!

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